overtime Tag

Working overtime to keep up

05 Apr Working overtime to keep up

What if my employer gives me more work than I can accomplish in 40 hours and I'm working overtime to keep up Sometimes an employee ends up working overtime to keep up with their work. But what if your employer hasn't authorized your overtime? What if they don't know that you're working nights or weekends to keep up? Can you recover pay for that time? In general, an employer can prohibit you from working overtime. But, if you work that time, you should still be entitled to overtime pay, at least as long as the employer hasn't told you not to work any overtime. Especially if your employer gives you more than 40 hours of work. If they tell you, “Don't work more than 40 hours,” but you do so anyway, that’s different. In that case, you may not be able to recover overtime pay. But, if they give you the work, and they don’t tell you not to spend as much time as you need? Then you are entitled to overtime pay. Each case is different. If a court was looking at it, they might adjust how much overtime pay you are entitled to. In doing so, the court will consider the specific circumstances of how you worked those overtime hours. Another factor is whether the employer knew about the overtime. If you believe that your employer has failed to pay you overtime that you have earned, contact the Khadder Law Firm today for a free consultation. For more, follow us on Twitter and Instagram....

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Overtime and record keeping

02 Apr Overtime claims and record-keeping

A common issue arises regarding overtime claims and record-keeping, or the failure to keep records. Both California and federal law require employers to pay overtime to eligible employees. If your employer hasn't paid you overtime to which you're entitled, you can bring a lawsuit against your employer to recover that pay. In most cases, you can prove your claim using your employer's records. But what if your employer hasn't kept records of your overtime? Proving overtime claims and record-keeping It's more difficult to prove your claims if your employer doesn't have adequate records of your hours. Fortunately, California has laws regarding overtime claims and record-keeping. California law requires employers to keep and maintain records on the hours that their non-exempt employees work. If they fail to do so, they can be liable for penalties under the California labor code. Therefore, if your employer is complying with the law, you should be able to prove your claim with their records. But even if they don't, the law still allows you to pursue your claims. Proving claims without your employer's records Ideally, your employer has records that accurately reflect how much overtime you've worked. But this isn't always the case. While this can make things more complicated, it's not fatal. For example, suppose an employee sues her employer for failure to pay overtime and the employer hasn't kept records of that overtime. Typically, the court will allow the employee to estimate the amount of overtime they have worked. The court will take that into consideration in determining how much the employee can recover. The more precisely you can estimate the overtime, the better. If you believe that your employer has failed to pay you overtime that you have earned, contact the Khadder Law Firm today for a free consultation. For more, follow us on Twitter....

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24 Mar Attorney’s fees and overtime cases

People often ask about attorney's fees and overtime cases. The California law that allows you to sue your employer for unpaid overtime has a one-way fee shifting provision. If your employer doesn't pay you overtime you've earned, you can sue them. If you win, you may be able to collect attorney's fees from the employer in addition to the unpaid overtime. But if you lose, your employer cannot go after you for attorney fees. That's how the one-way fee shifting works. One-way shifting of attorney's fees and overtime cases There's a simple logic behind the one-way fee shifting provision. It is California public policy that employees should get paid for the work that they've performed. Because most unpaid overtime claims are not that large, lawyers would be hesitant to take them if all they could only collect part of their client's recovery. Accordingly, allowing employees to collect fees to pay their attorney makes these claims worthwhile for attorneys. But the possibility of paying for defendant's attorney's fees would deter employees from suing. Therefore, this rule only goes one way to further incentivize employees to sue for unpaid overtime. Attorney's fees and the Private Attorney General Act There is also something called the Private Attorney General Act or PAGA. The PAGA basically deputizes citizens to recover penalties on behalf of the state of California. If you win, you can keep 75% of the penalties. You then pay the state the remaining 25%. The PAGA covers many types of claim under the labor code, including overtime and minimum wage. If you have a claim that doesn't include attorney's fees, be able to sue under the PAGA and get fees that way. If you believe you have a claim for unpaid overtime, contact the Khadder Law Firm today for a free consultation. For more, follow us on Twitter and Instagram....

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20 Mar Paying for overtime claims

Many people express concern about paying for overtime claims. Unfortunately, it often doesn’t make economic sense for a lawyer to take on wage and hour claims. Such claims generally smaller and cost more than they are worth. But there is still hope. Fortunately, there are a few ways you can still vindicate your rights, even if your claim is not that big. The first, is that you can go directly to the California Labor Commission to file a wage claim with them. It’s an expedited process so it’s usually faster than going to court. Moreover, it doesn’t cost you anything and you don’t need a lawyer.   Pursuing a class action claim is another option. When there is a class action claim for overtime of minimum wage or other wage and hour issues, then lawyers have much bigger economic incentive to get involved. Consequently, that would be a way to go vindicate your wage and hour rights.   Another possible avenue is if you have additional claims against your employer. For example, you may may have claims for discrimination, harassment or retaliation along with your wage and hour claims. In that case, the lawyer would probably be more likely to get involved because the harassment, retaliation or discrimination claim would make the case more lucrative. Obciously, this provides  an incentive for the lawyer to take on the case. While they’re at it, they’ll just add on the wage and hour violation claims as well.   Finally, the the labor code provides for attorney's fees for some overtime claims. If you prevail on such a claim, the employer will have to pay for your attorney's fees. This incentivizes attorneys to take your case. If you believe you have a wage and hour claims, contact the Khadder Law Firm today for a free consultation. For more, follow us Twitter and Instagram....

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unscheduled work days and overtime

20 Mar Unscheduled Work Days and Overtime

People often ask about unscheduled work days and overtime. How do unscheduled work days and overtime work. Does working an unscheduled shift entitle you to overtime pay? The answer depends on your schedule. Unfortunately, the mere fact of working an unscheduled day does not, by itself, entitle you to overtime pay. But, if that unscheduled shift pushes you over a certain threshold, you will be entitled to overtime pay. California law considers any work more than 8 hours in a day to be overtime. So if you work 9 hours in a day, you're entitled to 1 hour of overtime pay. Likewise for more than 40 hours in a week. So if you work 41 hours in a week, you're entitled to 1 hour of overtime pay (more if you worked more than 8 hours on any day). If you have worked 40 hours, Monday through Friday, and then you are required to come in on Saturday, and you are a non-exempt employee, then you're entitled to overtime pay for Saturday. This isn't because you worked a day you weren't scheduled tow work. Instead, it's because you worked over 40 hours in that week. But, if you haven’t worked 40 hours in week, from Monday through Friday, and you have to come in on a Saturday, then as long as it’s under 8 hours or has not exceeded 40 hours in a week, total, then you would just be entitled to your standard pay. If your employer has failed to pay you overtime pay that you've earned, contact the Khadder Law Firm today for a free consultation. For more, follow us on Twitter and Instagram....

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